Here are a Few Ideas and Choices For Your Kitchen Floors

 

Given the incredibly wide assortment of kitchen floor coverings on the market today, it takes a keen eye and a frugal yet analytical mind to make a wise choice. Picking aesthetically pleasing kitchen floor coverings that go well with a current or planned decor while remaining useful and easy to clean is a difficult chore. Of course one can't forget to factor the cost consideration into the equation.

Perhaps the best way to decide which kitchen floor coverings are ideal for any remodeling task should begin with a brief overview of each type. There are three common types of flooring choices: hardwood, ceramic, and linoleum. Each as its own inherent strengths and weaknesses which makes them more suitable for some situations and less suitable for other kitchen floor coverings. There are other choices as well, but these are the three most common.

One important aesthetic and practical consideration is whether or not the kitchen serves double duty as a dining room. If this is the case one will need to take special care to purchase more rugged and easily cleaned kitchen floor coverings or plan for a more frequently remodeling schedule. The furniture in a dining area will also have an aesthetic influence on the color and material of kitchen floor covering one chooses. After all, a floor does not a room make. Nor does furniture necessarily have to dictate ones choice in kitchen floor coverings, but failing to take existing or planned furniture into account is most likely a grievous error.
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For example: a kitchen with light wood cabinets and white countertops would go well with white linoleum or white ceramic, but not with most woods. Keeping all horizontal surfaces within a narrow band of color and style while having horizontal surfaces in another range of colors and/or a differing material can create a visually pleasing effect. Furniture should also follow this color schema, but there are notable exceptions.

In an all-wood kitchen the choice is fairly open so long as the color of the kitchen floor coverings match the rest of the items found in the room. Selecting a dark hardwood floor when all other fixtures and furniture can be discordant and visually unappealing. For rooms with an all-wood motif, select either a hardwood floor or properly colored linoleum or ceramic tiling. Hardwood floor is generally the most expensive option, but there are laminated flooring options which are significantly more affordable. Tiling would be the second choice in such a room, with linoleum being a distant last and often looking cheap or tawdry.

Regardless of which material of kitchen floor coverings is ultimately chosen, one must also take durability and maintenance into consideration. Large families, especially those with children and/or pets, will provide more challenges to the durability of any floor. For large, active families a proper choice will need to be able to withstand everything from scrapes and scuffs to dings and dents.

Most ceramic kitchen floor coverings are innately resilient but can still be chipped if sufficient force is applied. Some hardwoods are actually easily scratched despite the common perception that all hardwoods are nearly impervious to physical damage from everyday activities. Linoleum is probably the easiest of kitchen floor coverings to damage, but it is also the easiest to replace and the lowest cost.

Both linoleum and hardwood are easily cleaned, though most hardwood floorings need some additional maintenance every few years to remain properly protected from moisture. Ceramic tile typically posses a depressed network of grout between tiles which can make routine cleaning a little more difficult compared to linoleum and hardwood.